• Science

    Are social networks making us worse people?

    Marta Giménez, PhD in Psychology, psychologist and head of the Research and Innovation area of our centre Área Humana, has participated in the magazine “Yo Dona” of El Mundo, to debate the influence of social networks on people, together with María Hinojosa, actress, on musical stages (Cabaret, The Hole…), on television in series such as Amar en tiempos revueltos and El Continental. She is about to make her first big screen appearance with My Lost Love, along with Dani Rovira and Michelle Jenner. What do you think they’ll answer to questions like…: Do nets bring out the worst in us? And if so, how can we solve it? Is the…

  • Science

    Is neuroscience the recipe for better education?

    Anna Carballo (Barcelona, 1982), PhD in Neurosciences from the Autonomous University of Barcelona, does not speak of neuroeducation because she believes that it is a discipline that does not yet exist. She defends it well: neuroscientific studies on learning are carried out in laboratories, which have nothing to do with a classroom in which 30 students learn together spontaneously and naturally. He believes that the problems of education cannot be solved with the knowledge one has of the brain and that it is the pedagogues who must rethink teaching. Professor of the Master’s Degree in Learning Difficulties and Language Disorders at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and trainer and…

  • Science

    New ways of working in traditional organic chemistry

    The Paris Agreement on climate change and the growing scientific and technological interest in biomass valorisation are leading to the exploration of new ways of working, more respectful of the environment, in traditional organic chemistry. Among these novelties is the improvement of the transformation of usual compounds, such as ketones into alcohols and hydrocarbons, and vice versa. In this context, researchers from the Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry of the University of Barcelona (IQTCUB) (Catalonia, Spain) and the Institute of Chemistry of the University of Leiden (Holland) have studied the electrochemical reduction of acetone, the simplest and probably most important of ketones. The results, published in the journal Nature…

  • Science

    This is how new species emerge in the sea

    How can new species be formed if animals live together and can be crossed? A team from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama and the GEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany, studied Caribbean reef fish to find out. Their discovery that natural selection combines the evolution of genes for vision and color pattern was published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. For a new species to evolve, two things are essential: a characteristic such as a color, unique to a species, and a mating preference for that color. For example, individuals of a blue fish species prefer blue pairs and individuals of a red species prefer red…

  • Science

    The humpback whale is the most acoustically complex animal

    Today, there are some 15,000 humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in the world, named for the hump they have on their dorsal fin. By the mid-20th century, however, this figure was much lower. In 1966, the population of individuals of this type was less than two thousand. That is why conservation and observation is necessary among experts in marine biology to prevent it from becoming an animal in danger of extinction again. That is precisely why scientists are now trying to study their behaviour through sounds. To this end, researchers from the University of Extremadura, specifically in the area of Ecology in the Department of Plant Biology, Ecology and Earth Sciences,…

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    Ancient DNA confirms the origin of the first settlers in the Canary Islands

    Some 20 million years ago, volcanic activity brought the islands that make up the Canary archipelago out of the depths of the sea, which is why these lands were never connected to the African continent. However, in the 13th century when European sailors discovered various groups of islands in the Atlantic, only the Canary Islands were inhabited. That indigenous population had habits and dialects similar to the nearest Berber populations, but they did not know the methods of navigation. They were completely isolated from the African continent. The later conquests by the Kingdom of Castile, the beginning of sugar cane plantations and the slave trade led not only to the…

  • Science

    Male, White Artists Cup Top U.S. Museums

    Mathematician Chad Topaz says that while working at William College (USA), the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art – about a ten-minute drive away – opened a new art room. “I was interested in the artists they had chosen for the exhibition and wanted to know if it was a diverse show, but when I asked I saw that there was no large-scale study of it. I immediately fell in love with the idea of carrying out the study,” this professor from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics tells Sinc. This week, PLOS ONE magazine publishes the results of this demographic research in which Topaz and his colleagues analyse the gender,…

  • Science

    Publication of the most complete underwater cartography of the INBIS channel in the Arctic Ocean.

    A scientific study details for the first time the underwater cartography of the upper sections of the INBIS channel, a submerged valley that extends along tens of kilometers northwest of the Barents Sea, in the Arctic Ocean. This channel is one of the few underwater valleys in polar latitudes that preserved its particular geological architecture during the last glacial maximum (LGM), according to the new work published in the journal Arktos – The Journal of Arctic Geosciences, in which Professor José Luis Casamor, member of the Consolidated Research Group (GRC) in Marine Geosciences of the Faculty of Earth Sciences of the University of Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain), participates. Experts from the…

  • Science

    Bacteria Can Help Tree Frogs Attract Partners

    Brazilian scientists discovered that the strong odor exhaled by some species of amphibians is produced by bacteria, and would be a way to attract their partners. In a remarkable example of symbiosis, these bacteria help at the time of mating. This discovery about the role of such microorganisms, isolated in the skin of tree frogs, was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). “Tree frogs exhale a strong odor. Occasionally, a specimen of a particular species can even be recognized on the basis of its aroma, but the function of that smell was not yet known. One hypothesis indicated that it could be an aposematic aroma,…

  • Science

    CERN scientists detect new type of matter-antimatter asymmetry

    The scientific collaboration that operates the LHCb experiment, located near Geneva in the European Particle Physics Laboratory (CERN) and of which Spanish scientists are part, has detected for the first time the phenomenon known as ‘CP violation’ in the disintegrations of the particle called meson D0. The discovery was presented this Thursday at the annual conference of physicists in Moriond (France) and at a seminar at CERN, which has issued a statement indicating that this advance will become part of the textbooks of particle physics. “The result is a milestone in the history of particle physics. Since the discovery of meson D more than 40 years ago it was suspected…